Werewolf

2018

Drama / Horror / War

96
IMDb Rating 6.1 10 348

Synopsis


Downloaded times
February 2, 2020

Director

Cast

720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
788.58 MB
1280*720
Polish
NR
23.976 fps
88 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.39 GB
1920×1080
Polish
NR
23.976 fps
88 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Fella_shibby 10 / 10 / 10

This film is so opposite Lord Of The Flies. It is a case study that despite everything, kids r decent n compassionate

The underlying meaning in this film is the actual truth of humanity n not like Lord Of... The premise is a bit similar, in fact even more harsher than Lord Of... Children r saved from a Nazi concentration camp but they encounter hunger, thirst and dogs in a hostile war ravaged environment. The best part is the acting n the child actors nailed it. The film does have some brutal n dark scenes, lil suspense n heart pounding tension. The actual truth about humanity: v aint fighters, bt lovers. Our internal default is 2 work 2gethr. Despite everything, humanity is actually decent - Rutger Bregman.

Reviewed by HairyMart1 7 / 10 / 10

Not the horror you think

Not the horror you think it is. Dealing with young children rescued from a concentration camp by the Russian forces at the end of WW2. Taken to a country house with limited food and water. Their situation deteriorates dramatically when they find themselves surrounded by vicious guard dogs from the very death camp they escaped from. Part Lord of the Flies, part Cujo, the tradegy of their existence is brought home time and time again - be it fighting for a simple potato peeling, or the stories they tell of the sights they witnessed. The struggle here is for them to hold on to the slender thread of humanity they still have within them, or decent into a vicious existence, that matches the dogs that threaten them.

Reviewed by Coventry 7 / 10 / 10

The Lord of the Nazi Guard Dogs

Perhaps this wasn't the ideal film to go and see with my wife on our date night. And yet, "Werewolf" is a truly captivating, original, courageous and hauntingly realistic hybrid of genres. Polish writer/director Adrian Panek touches upon several extremely sensitive topics, and yet his film never becomes overly melodramatic, preachy or moralizing. On the contrary, I even had the impression that Panek primarily wanted to make a horror/thriller movie, but that it gradually turned into horror mixed with psychological war-drama and coming-of-age fable. "Werewolf" is unique but finds inspiration in classic William Golden novel "Lord of the Flies" and uses ideas that I've seen in more obscure films like "The Seasoning House" (2012), "White Dog" (1982) and "The Pack" (1977). The film opens with grisly and devastating images set in the Nazi concentration camp of Gross-Rosen in 1945, where sadist German soldiers are still rapidly executing as many prisoners as possible before they are liberated. A group of orphaned children, heavily traumatized and practically famished, flee into the thick woods and find shelter in an abandoned mansion. They still aren't safe, though, since there isn't any food or water and vengeful Russian and German soldiers are still prowling the area. When things seemingly can't get any worse, the children become trapped inside the mansion by a pack of hungry and bewildered dogs; - the former guard dogs of the concentration camp that were set free. "Werewolf" is a slow-paced but incredibly intense and atmospheric film with several stupendous performances from the young and inexperienced cast and a marvelous use of set pieces and filming locations. The sequences with the dogs are truly suspenseful and very well-choreographed. Just to illustrate: we watched "Werewolf" at the Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival, where the crowd is always loud, cheerful and where it's customary to sing during the film or shout funny remarks at the screen. This film managed, however, to shut up the crowd throughout practically the entire running time. Any film that accomplishes this at the BIFFF must have a powerful impact, I guarantee you.

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