The White Crow

2018

Biography / Drama

36
IMDb Rating 6.5 10 2,055

Synopsis


Downloaded 29,492 times
August 13, 2019

Director

Cast

Olivier Rabourdin as Alexinsky
Ralph Fiennes as Pushkin
Raphaël Personnaz as Pierre Lacotte
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.01 GB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.13 GB
1920×1080
English
R
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.05 GB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.02 GB
1920×1080
English
R
23.976 fps
127 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by JamesHitchcock 8 / 10 / 10

Belaya Vorona

The film's title derives from the Russian phrase "belaya vorona", or "white crow", meaning an outsider or nonconformist, a person who stands out from his or her contemporaries in the way that a white crow would stand out from its black fellows. The "white crow" of this film is the Russian ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev, a man who had difficulty conforming to the official Soviet system, either in his artistic life or in his personal life. (He was gay at a time when this was neither lawful nor acceptable in Soviet society). Nureyev shocked the world of ballet when he defected to the West at Le Bourget airport, Paris, in 1961, and the film is built around this incident. His decision to defect was, apparently, a spontaneous one, taken when the Communist authorities, irritated by the fact that he had spent much of his time in Paris in the company of Western intellectuals and concerned by rumours that he had been seen in a gay bar, decided to send him back to Russia rather than allowing him to travel with the Kirov ballet to London, the next leg of their tour. Scenes of Nureyev's stay in Paris are intercut with flashbacks to his poverty-stricken wartime childhood in the provincial city of Ufa and to his time as a ballet student in Leningrad, as St Petersburg was then known. The film was directed by the well-known British actor Ralph Fiennes, clearly a ballet enthusiast. Fiennes also takes an acting role as Alexander Pushkin- not, of course, the classic Russian author but Nureyev's tutor at the Kirov Ballet. This was, I felt, one of two outstanding performances in the film. Pushkin emerges not only as a visionary who spotted Nureyev's talent when many did not but also as a sympathetic father-figure who provided the young dancer with a kindness and understanding that was otherwise lacking in the rigid, inflexible Soviet system. The other great performance, of course, comes from the young Oleg Ivenko as the conflicted Nureyev himself. On the one hand he is held by a love of his Russian homeland, the land which contains all he knows and all that he has held dear- his family, his friends and his mentor Pushkin. On the other hand, he is drawn towards the West, not only because of the greater intellectual freedom which it offers but also because of a feeling that it is only there that he can fully realise himself as a dancer. I must admit that I am not a great balletomane myself; I have been to the ballet on only a handful of occasions in my life, and never saw Nureyev dance except on television. Yet there are some films which have been good enough able to hold my attention even though they are centred upon activities in which I would normally take little interest. Like most Britons, I know little about baseball, yet I was enthralled by "Eight Men Out" and "Field of Dreams". I probably know even less about wrestling, but that did not prevent me from admiring the more recent "Foxcatcher". "White Crow" comes into the same category. Those who love ballet will doubtless be enthralled by it. Even those of us who do not will be able to see enough in this movie to understand the enthusiasm of those who do. And both groups will join together in their appreciation of the human drama which lies at the heart of Rudolf Nureyev's story. 8/10

Reviewed by FrenchEddieFelson 1 / 10 / 10

What a legend!

A biopic about Rudolf Nureyev: gifted with an exemplary technique, he is considered as the greatest classical dancer and as one of the greatest choreographers. The actors Oleg Ivenko and Chulpan Khamatova are excellent whereas Ralph Fiennes is magnificent with a masterful interpretation of Alexander Pushkin, with restraint and sensitivity. He literally impressed me! Nevertheless, as a director, Ralph Fiennes is less convincing. He excessively insists on the haughty and unpleasant character of Rudolf Nureyev, to such a point that we almost want to slap him. In addition, the manifold alternations between the trip to Paris in 1961 (the present time) and the flashbacks (his childhood in a poor family and his debut as a dancer) are almost disturbing. I would have appreciated that Ralph Fiennes develops these different points: 1) An evocation of the trip to Vienna in 1959, formerly Western Europe, followed by a formal ban on all abroad travel formulated by the Russian Minister of Culture, which could have explained, without justifying, the oppressive and stifling behavior of the KGB members, in Paris in 1961. 2) A less dark presentation of the Soviet Union reduced to KGB members as obtuse as omnipotent. Indeed, at the beginning of the 60s, the Soviet aura was supreme: culture, science, geopolitical influence, ... For instance, the dramatic Nureyev's defection at the Paris Le Bourget Airport happened just two months after the Bay of Pigs invasion which was a significant failure for Kennedy's US foreign policy and a strong reinforcement of the relations between Cuba and the Soviet Union. As a synthesis, the movie is excellently interpreted but the realization is slightly muddleheaded. 6/7 of 10.

Reviewed by predragazdejkovic 1 / 10 / 10

Straightwashing

I had the opportunity to see the film in Belgrade at FEST - International Film Festival. First, it's interesting that Serbian Film Institute gave 5 million euros for the film, but isn't listed as production country! Second, the film is to long and boring till the end, but also the ending isn't exiting. Rudolf Nureyev was an interesting person but this film made him boring and uninteresting. I could not understand why the director decided to minimize his queerness, especially that his sexual identity was one of the reasons why he wanted to leave Soviet Union. Rudolf had huge sexual appetite and in this film he is asexual! In the end the director decided not to include the information that Rudolf Nureyev died of complications of AIDS and I find it disrespectful.

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