The Little Stranger

2018

Drama / Horror / Mystery

34
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 65%
IMDb Rating 5.6 10 4,357

Synopsis


Downloaded 118,776 times
April 2, 2019

Cast

Charlotte Rampling as Dixie Riggs
Ruth Wilson as Princess Betsy Tverskoy
Will Poulter as Fordy
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
960.5 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
111 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.8 GB
1920×1080
English
R
23.976 fps
111 min
P/S N/A / N/A
956.94 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
111 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.79 GB
1920×1080
English
R
23.976 fps
111 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Fourstrawberries 8 / 10 / 10

Very cleverly constructed period mystery, dark complex charaters and excellently acted.

Something of an emotional roller coaster. None of the characters are quite what they seem to be, it's almost as if they culture some hope and then dash it to the ground just as the viewer is lulled into a hope of a happy concluson to that particular scene. Gradually the superficial character of each key player is stripped away to reveal something unexpected about them. The good become villains, and sometimes good again. The supposed villains revealed to be good or just victims of some unseen manipulator. The story does come to an end. It's not one of those sadistic films where you're left wondering what the hell just happened, but you are left placing the last few pieces of the puzzle together for yourself . If you're looking for whizz-bang special effect laden offerings that require nothing more than propping your eyelids open for a couple of hours, then look to Hollywood. British horror/mystery has led the world in high quality intellectually stimulating film making over the last few years, and this is another superb offering that rests well with the likes of "Dark Song" and "Apostle".

Reviewed by MisterWhiplash 10 / 10 / 10

it's missing something, but I'm not sure what

I'll be kind to this film in this respect: Lenny Abrahamson didn't set out to play by the usual (or at least de rigeur) rules that govern a lot of creepy-old house stories, as this is about 90% of the time a drama with some touches of very staid and not-all-there romance, and then in the last third he and his crew try their hand at a couple of sequences where some supernatural entity attacks a couple of the characters left in the Hundred's (sic) Hall in this small provincial English town (which you know is far from most civilization as characters talk of London like it's some far away distant land, and this is in the 1930's I think). The studio who put this out may have been between a rock and a hard place: how to sell a movie that has the veneer of Gothic Horror, but doesn't have the passions of a Jane Eyre (I believe Focus Features, which also put out the 2011 Eyre, put this out too), or Crimson Peak (which I now love even more for just GOING FOR IT as far as a massively extravagant stylistic experience). And for some reason, perhaps due to the bankability(?) of Domnhall Gleeson - who I like a lot generally, especially now as General Hux in the new Star Wars - it was released on more screens than it should have been at an inopportune time. I wish it had done better in some capacity, maybe at an earlier time in the year when people might not be busy with the Back to School season, or with less awards-fare competition, but.... it may just be that it's "Alright" quality was going to leave it struggling. Not to mention that poster; like, what the hell IS that? Terrible. Anyway, The Little Stranger isn't as dull as you've heard, at least if you stick with it past its opening half hour. Except for a somewhat nutty and make-up overloaded performance from Will Poulter, it starts off as dry as an eraser-board. Maybe some of it is due to the mood of this emotionally tight English feeling of the early 20th century, or the place this Hall is at in general, but it is hard to get into this mood at first with the color scheme on the gray side (which, yeah, again it is England on any given day, I get it). Once the plot really kicks in as far as it goes, that this Dr Faraday becomes ensconced with this family, most especially Ruth Wilson, and they showed a bit more of Faraday's backstory of his attachment (or his unspoken terror) of the Hall from when he was a boy, then I started to want to know more about what was going on and where it goes to. And with Gleeson here, he's... good, but something I can't really vocalize or think right now holds him back somehow. That may be by design, either in the writing or from Abrahamson, but he is *so* reserved that you suspect he may be hiding something, until it is beyond the point of caring what it may be about. He may be both entirely right *and* entirely wrong for this part, if that makes sense, as a doctor who is supposed to ignite something in the Wilson character - will she leave this place, maybe marry, find some other path in life than staying in this house, and she actually has a more interesting arc in that respect than he does -but ultimately there's complications if nothing else from the Hall itself... or the perception of things going on in it. So I'm not going to say he's miscast, as he does what he can, but maybe it's some misdirection somehow, or that if there was something more in the book this was based on it never got off the page. Oh, don't get me wrong, I'll still be happy to see a performance from him that is just 'Okay' than by many others who don't rise up to the challenge. And Poulter, Wilson and Charlotte Rampling are all doing excellent work from what they're given (Wilson particularly near the end reminded me why I grew fond of her difficult character on The Affair). And the Hall itself can't help but he an intriguing location to shoot in. However, when this reaches into its last third, I can't help but feel its dips into horror take away from what would be a more... I'm not sure, emotionally complex given how much the filmmakers try to make it more about the characters than about the kind of schlocky jump scare horror effects that go out to the popcorn audiences. In other words, I get why it does become a horror movie in its last third, but something feels lost in the process. This may seem like a higher star rating than it deserves, but I didn't dislike this film. I think Abrahamson is too skilled at making good scenes and some impactful images (i.e. Poulter burning that bookcase, the dance scene) for it to be a total disappointment. That said, after the one-two punch of ROOM and the underrated rock and roll trip FRANK, it feels like a step down in some way that's hard to articulate even after stepping out of the theater.

Reviewed by mattdzolan 10 / 10 / 10

From a certain angle.

This is not a "slow burn". It is a crafted piece of film put together to tell a story of a man who yearns to live in a part of society he can never truly be a part of. If you watch this film with that thought in mind, you'll understand it better. Dr. Faraday we learn early on, is a small town doctor who prides himself as being a respectable, proper gentleman. He does all the little things required to be a part of upper society but can never really be upper class as he is the son of a lower class family whose mother was a maid. The defining moment of his childhood (shown in the film) was a visit to Hundreds Hall for a party thrown by the well-to-do Ayres family for their young daughter Susan (Suki). he notices the opulence, the pomp and circumstance of it all. The event is from a different world than the one little Faraday lives in. He knows he doesn't belong but he yearns to be a part of this group of people. A photograph, where Suki jumps in front of Faraday is a small example of this exclusion. Through a coincidence, he is able to get into the house that was restricted to outside guests, and delves further into the life he cannot possibly attain. In the kitchen he literally gets a taste of the sweet life when he licks cake batter off a spoon as his mother talks with some of the maids. While she is distracted, he wanders off through the house, admiring the size and luxuriousness of the interior halls. He arrives at the grand staircase and he thinks deeply about wanting nothing more than to be a part of this family; living in this house. He wants it so bad that he breaks off a stone acorn from the wall. All the while, Suki is watching, smiling at this foolish little pleb of a boy. His mother find him and confronts him on his disappearance. He reveals the acorn and she slaps him across the face for his doltishness. He should not even have dared to dream of being a part of this world. As we move into the present day with Faraday now Dr. Faraday, he has grown up but he is, in a lot of ways, still that little boy. That little stranger who does not belong in that house with that family. Understanding this will help to understand the movie. It is not a supernatural horror film. It is a film about a man trying desperately to be part of something he cannot ever really be a part of. As hard as he might to be a refined British gentleman with glowing credentials, he is still the lower class country boy. When Faraday meets the Ayres family, they, like the house they live in, are all in various states of disrepair and neglect.The mother has never gotten over the death of her first child Suki. The son, and heir to the estate, has been physically damaged in the war. The daughter, frumpy and tired, has let herself go, resigned to the fact that her mother loves her dead sister more. Upon meeting and then visiting the family often, Dr. Faraday builds a rapport that he hopes will bring him closer to that childhood desire of being a part of this class. However, even as they are all shadows of their former selves and he is a rising star amongst his middle class peers, Dr. Faraday never attains their upper class status. As each family member side-tracks him from that ambition, he coldly takes steps to eliminate them. We never see on screen the wicked deeds he executes but he methodically gets rid of anyone in his way of winning the prize he so desires. He banishes the son to an asylum, he fakes the mother's death as a suicide, he murders the daughter who turned down his marriage proposal. In the end, with the Ayres family gone, the house is left desolate and barren. There is no furniture and the rooms are littered with dead leaves, blown in from the outside through broken windows. Dr. Faraday holds the keys to the house suggesting he its the owner. It it literally a hollow shell of its former glory, but to Dr. Faraday, the house is a prize worth having no matter the derelict conditions. The last shot of the film is a teary eyed little Faraday, standing at the top of the grand staircase looking down as if to suggest he never stopped being that sad, little boy who just wanted so desperately to be a part of something.

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