The Ballad of Cable Hogue

1970

Comedy / Drama / Romance / Western

135
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 93%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 81%
IMDb Rating 7.3 10 7,563

Synopsis


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March 31, 2019

Director

Cast

David Warner as Lord Nicholas "Nick" Dorset
Jason Robards as Jacob 'J.W.' Ewing
Slim Pickens as Yarbrough
Stella Stevens as Amelia Crusoe
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
1010.01 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
121 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.92 GB
1920×1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
121 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Spikeopath 9 / 10 / 10

Peckinpah's lyrical vision of the West provides humour and comfort to director and viewer alike.

The Ballad Of Cable Hogue sees Sam Peckinpah in jolly form. There is nothing here to trouble the censors, a bit of violence here and there - and some nasty human traits seam through the story, but this is purely a funny and touching movie that again deals with a Peckinpah fave theme of the Old West passing. Only difference is here he has his tongue firmly in cheek as he observes the thirst for finance sweeping across the country. Cable Hogue is a prospector left for dead in the desert by his two double-crossing partners Bowen & Taggart. Wandering across the desert talking to god, Hogue collapses during a sandstorm and finds mud on his boot, after digging down for a while he finds the miracle of water (though Hogue badly misspells this on his advertisement). An encounter with preacher Joshua convinces Hogue to go patent his spring and make a killing selling water to the passing stagecoach trail that runs by his newly found oasis. After striking a deal in the town of Dead Dog, Hogue is set up nicely while into the bargain he falls for gorgeous prostitute Hildy. The film cheekily (just like Hogue) has established itself as a fine piece by the time it takes it's dark turn. It seems that revenge is the new found recipe on the Cable Springs Menu. This was Sam Peckinpah's favourite film from his own CV, it's his most personal, he apparently saw a lot of himself in Cable Hogue, and with that in mind the film does gain a bit more emotional heart. But strikingly, it's the humour in there that shouldn't be understated, this was the director at one with himself, and the result is lyrical deftness. The cast are great, Jason Robards is wonderful in the title role, Stella Stevens as Hildy shows a fine actress at work. So much so it only makes me lament that she didn't have a great and industrious career post Cable Hogue. Peckinpah faves Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones & Slim Pickens reward their loyal director with impacting shows, while David Warner as the confused preacher Joshua practically steals the film with his hedonistic leanings. Don't go into this film expecting a blood and thunder Western and you will be pleasantly surprised at it's heartbeat. Different sort of Peckinpah, but it's also essential Peckinpah. 9/10

Reviewed by Bob-45 9 / 10 / 10

Sam Peckinpah's Multigenred Masterpiece

Fresh off his triumphant "The Wild Bunch" and just before his astounding "Straw Dogs," Sam Peckipah made this "little picture," that flopped. However, while "The Wild Bunch" and "Straw Dogs" are terrific movies, "Ballad of Cable Hogue" is the most accomplished of the three. It certainly is hard to categorize "...Hogue," thematically. It includes strong elements of the following genres: o Violent western o Slapstick comedy o Sophisticated comedy o Romantic comedy o Love story o Social commentary o Spiritual film With the exception of the rather silly slapstick, director Sam Peckinpah handles all these elements superbly, particularly the social commentary, spiritual elements and love story. Much credit is due to a fine cast, particularly actress Stella Stevens and actor David Warner, who both deserved Oscar nominations. Stevens, as the prostitute, "Hildy," mines the "...heart of gold" and hits the mother lode. Hers is one of the all time great performances by an actress. Warner's manipulative preacher, "Josh," manages to be alternately witty, lecherous, noble and profound, without missing a beat. The best I can say about Jason Robards as "Cable" is, if you loved his character, "Cheyenne" from "Once Upon a Time in the West," you love his "Cable Hogue." Don't read the plot of this movie. Go in as I did in 1970, not knowing what to expect. You'll be amused, touched, aroused (particularly if your a male) and saddened. It's all here. How many films can you say that about? I give "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" a "10."

Reviewed by Mickey-2 9 / 10 / 10

A tribute to the passing days of the Old West by a director/genius

"The Ballad of Cable Hogue", when first released in 1970, may have caught the viewing public asleep. But, over the years, people have seen this film for what it truly is--a tribute by director Sam Peckinpah to the passing away of the old west, and a brilliant performance turned in by Jason Robards as a desert hobo who finally awakens to his need for touching base with the human race, ever so often. Cable is left out in the desert by two comrades, Bowen and Taggart, to make his own way, or perish trying, as they head back to civilization. Hogue vows to catch up to them, but first, he has to find water, which he does, then establish a business for the stage line, which he is able to do, and show a profit. All this happens, and after several years of waiting, the two former friends do happen onto his way station, and a touch of revenge is extracted by Cable upon the two who left him in the desert. This film has some remarkable elements; a great supporting cast led by Stella Stevens, playing Hildy, David Warner portrays a lecherous preacher who becomes Hogue's partner in the desert, and Strother Martin and L. Q. Jones add the touch of villiany this film needed. Also, the musical background will stay with the viewer long after the final credits have rolled. This movie is a fantastic portrayal of the fading era of the west, and Peckinpah left the public with a classic. 9/10, easily.

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