Octopussy

1983

Action / Adventure / Thriller

135
IMDb Rating 6.6 10 87,344

Synopsis


Downloaded 56,840 times
August 11, 2019

Director

Cast

Ingrid Pitt as Galley Mistress
Maud Adams as Octopussy
Roger Moore as Lord Edgar Dobbs
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
950.27 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
131 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.85 GB
1920×1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
131 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by TheFearmakers 9 / 10 / 10

This Beat 'Never Say Never Again' For A Reason...

OCTOPUSSY is original and not a remake of the already medicore THUNDERBALL, the Sean Connery flick that was great on the ground but the last act underwater is as slow as being... and fighting, especially... underwater... So there's a remake with an aged Sean Connery back as Bond (yes, he was technically younger than Roger Moore, but didn't look it), and the most intense scene is Bond playing a video game against his opponent. No joke. In this, the second to last Roger Moore Bond, which is a celebration of all things pulpy and an answer to Raiders of the Lost Ark (like Moonraker was to Star Wars), the action never stops, and there are always reasons for, basically, a lot of cool stuff to happen. And keep happening. That's that.

Reviewed by ThomasHayden 7 / 10 / 10

More Moore!!!

Many criticized this film at the time of its release with comments like" Moore's tongue in cheek humor has turned Bond's style into brainless films , full of silly jokes, with no plot or character development. Just look at that annoying jungle sequence with Moore parodying Tarzan." OK I concede this scene was a dreadful idea. But its minor flaws aside, Octopussy is, in my opinion, one the greatest Bond movies to date. What makes this movie extremely compelling is its adventurous storyline, which successfully combines the classic 70's spy thriller convoluted plot with amazing, yet surrealistic, action sequences, more likely to be part of a comic book (but a good one, indeed) such as the jet escape at the beginning, which is definitely the BEST pre-credit scene in the whole series. Bond moves from England to India, and then to Germany, while he tries to find out the truth in a mysterious conspiracy involving a stolen Faberge egg and... Well, it actually doesn't make sense ...but the individual sequences are great: 009's death, the purchase of the egg at Sotheby's, Bond and Khamal first encounter at the casino, the night assault on Octopussy's palace... and that lovable seduction scene, with these memorable lines: "We are two of the kind, there are vast rewards for a man of your talents willing to take risks / I am not for hire / Naturally you do it for queen and country, with the praise on your head. I have no country and no praise on my head... she leaves the room , Bond follows her and kisses her, replying, you were right, we are two of the kind" Ins't it delightful? But the pleasures Octopussy delivers don't end here. Louis Jourdan plays a glamorous, icy, double-dealing villain, perfectly balancing ruthlessness and elegance. He gets this great line" Mr. Bond, you have the nasty habit of surviving", almost comparable to Goldfinger's "Do you expect me to talk? No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die" And stunningly beautiful Maud Adams gets the leading role she deserved, since she's probably the most seductive and cool of all Bond girls. And the ending gag is wonderful as well, successfully capturing the film's essence. It isn't just Bond kissing the girl again, but reminds us of the fantasy world we have lived in for two hours. I still remember what a good time I had when I saw this movie for the first time. You cannot miss this one.

Reviewed by Spikeopath 7 / 10 / 10

Englishman. Likes eggs, preferably Fabergé, and dice, preferably loaded.

Octopussy is directed by John Glen and adapted to screenplay by George Macdonald Fraser, Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson. It stars Roger Moore, Maud Adams, Louis Jordan, Kabir Bedi, Steven Berkoff, Vijay Amritraj and Robert Brown. Music is scored by John Barry and cinematography by Alan Hume. Bond 13 and 007 is assigned to find the link between the murder of 009 and the Fabergé egg found in the slain agent's possession. His investigation leads him to uncover a fiendish plot by a rogue Soviet General to detonate a nuclear device that will leave Western Europe vulnerable to a Soviet attack. Undeniably the film that should have been Roger Moore's last as James Bond, Octopussy contains both the best and worst of the James Bond franchise. On the plus side is a very good core story that encompasses intelligent political overtones that were prevalent of the time period. A nuclear crisis is in the air and the East and the West, who have until now been casting suspicious eyes over each other, must co-operate to avert disaster. This closing down of the Cold War is nicely etched into the plot structure by the makers. The cast assembled is mostly impressive, with Adams and Jordan doing great characterisations, the photography by Hume makes India look like a paradise, Glen orchestrates some excellent action set-pieces, including one of the best pre-credits scenes of the series, and Barry's score is a swirl of romanticism and invention. The title song, All Time High sung by Rita Coolidge, is magnificent and this writer's personal favourite of all the Bond theme songs. While there's a new man enviably following the much missed Bernard Lee by playing M (Robert Brown) and Q (Desmond Llewelyn) gets a bigger role to play in the story. Sadly, even though Moore is continuing the good acting of Bond he achieved in For Your Eyes Only, he is looking his age and not physically suited to the action. He is also saddled with having to do moronic things like swinging on a vine whilst doing the Tarzan jungle yell. It's pretty painful to watch and you have to wonder who on earth thought it was a good idea? There's moments when a silly bit of humour undermines the good plotting, while Berkoff and Amritraj are in turn over the top villainy and scarcely believable as a field agent. The film looks cheap, a rarity for a Bond film, and the smartness of the story often gets buried beneath the weight of convolutions. Most galling is that we should have had a classic Bond movie, a gargantuan feast of sets and tough secret agent shenanigans, for this was the year when Bond as we know it was facing off against the Kevin McClory rival Bond movie, Never Say Never Again, and that had Sean Connery in it; though he was also like Moore in his early 50s and too old for the suit. The two films never met head to head at the box office, because McClory's was delayed. Both films made monster cash, with Octopussy grossing $184 million and Never Say Never Again copping $160 million, Bond, and the two actors playing the role were enough to ensure the cash tills rang loud and proud. But both films were solid rather than special, the profit margins were high but the quality wasn't. Octopussy has a bit of something for all types of Bond fans, but they just can't make a successful whole. From the Eon side of things there surely had to be a new direction, some decision making assertiveness instead of fluctuating between earthy Bond and ridiculous button pushing Bond, it needed some vim and vigour brought back into the fray. Moore planned to retire, and rightly so, was we about to see the dawn of a new Bond era? 7/10

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